Barack Obama Convention Speech and Transcript
President of the United States

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016
2016 Democratic National Convention
Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia, PA

 
 


Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.
Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you everybody.
Thank you. Thank you.
Thank you so much everybody. Thank you. Thank you.
Thank you everybody. Thank you.
Thank you so much everybody.
I love you back!

Hello, America. Hello, Democrats.

So... twelve years ago tonight, I addressed this convention for the very first time.

You met my two little girls, Malia and Sasha. Now two amazing young women who just fill me with pride. You fell for my brilliant wife and partner Michelle, who has made me a better father and a better man; who's gone on to inspire our nation as First Lady; and who somehow hasn't aged a day.

I know, the same can't be said for me. My girls remind me all the time. "Wow, you've changed so much, daddy." And then they tried to clean it up. "Not bad, just more mature."

And, and it's true – I was so young that first time in Boston. And, and, look I'll admit it - maybe a little nervous addressing such a big crowd. But I was filled with faith. Faith in America – the generous, bighearted, hopeful country that made my story, that made all of our stories – possible.

A lot's happened over the years. And while this nation has been tested by war and it's been tested recession and all manner of challenges, I stand before you again tonight, after almost two terms as your President, to tell you I am even more optimistic about the future of America than ever before.

How could I not be – after all that we've achieved together?

After the worst recession in 80 years, we've fought our way back. We've seen deficits come down, 401(k)s recover, an auto industry set new records, unemployment reach eight-year lows, and our businesses create 15 million new jobs.

After a century of trying, we declared that health care in America is not a privilege for a few, but it is a right for everybody.

After decades of talk, we finally began to wean ourselves off foreign oil. We doubled our production of clean energy. We brought more of our troops home to their families, and delivered justice to Osama bin Laden.

Through diplomacy, we shut down Iran's nuclear weapons program. We opened up a new chapter with the people of Cuba; brought nearly 200 nations together around a climate agreement that could save this planet for our children.

We put policies in place to help students with loans; protect consumers from fraud; and cut veteran homelessness almost in half. And through countless acts of quiet courage, America learned that love has no limits, and marriage equality is now a reality across the land.

By so many measures, our country is stronger and more prosperous than it was when we started.

And through every victory and every setback, I've insisted that change is never easy, and never quick; that we wouldn't meet all of our challenges in one term, or one presidency, or even in one lifetime.

So tonight, I'm here to tell you that yes, we still got more work to do. More work to do for every American still in need of a good job or a raise, paid leave or a decent retirement; for every child who needs a sturdier ladder out of poverty or a world-class education; for everyone who has not yet felt the progress of these past seven and a half years.

We need to keep making our streets safer and our criminal justice system fairer; our homeland more secure, our world more peaceful and sustainable for the next generation. We're not done perfecting our union, or living up to our founding creed – that all of us are created equal, all of us are free in the eyes of God.

That work involves a big choice this November. Fair to say, this is not your typical election. It's not just a choice between parties or policies; the usual debates between left and right. This is a more fundamental choice – about who we are as a people, and whether we stay true to this great American experiment in self-government.

Look, we Democrats have always had plenty of differences with the Republican Party, and there's nothing wrong with that; it's precisely this contest of ideas that pushes our country forward.

But what we heard in Cleveland last week wasn't particularly Republican – and it sure wasn't conservative. What we heard was a deeply pessimistic vision of a country where we turn against each other, and turn away from the rest of the world. There were no serious solutions to pressing problems – just the fanning of resentment, and blame, and anger, and hate.

And that is not the America I know.

The America I know is full of courage, and optimism, and ingenuity. The America I know is decent and generous. Sure, we have real anxieties – about paying the bills, protecting our kids, caring for a sick parent. We get frustrated with political gridlock, worry about racial divisions; are shocked and saddened by the madness of Orlando or Nice. There are pockets of America that never recovered from factory closures; men who took pride in hard work and providing for their families who now feel forgotten; parents who wonder whether their kids will have the same opportunities we had.

All that is real. We're challenged to do better; to be better. But as I've traveled this country, through all fifty states; as I've rejoiced with you and mourned with you, what I've also seen, more than anything, is what is right with America. I see people working hard and starting businesses; people teaching kids and serving our country. I see engineers inventing stuff, and doctors coming up with new cures. I see a younger generation full of energy and new ideas, not constrained by what is, ready to seize what ought to be.

Most of all, I see Americans of every party, every background, every faith who believe that we are stronger together – black, white, Latino, Asian, Native American; young and old; gay, straight, men, women, folks with disabilities, all pledging allegiance, under the same proud flag, to this big, bold country that we love.

That's the America I know. And there is only one candidate in this race who believes in that future, and has devoted her life to it; a mother and grandmother who'd do anything to help our children thrive; a leader with real plans to break down barriers, blast through glass ceilings, and widen the circle of opportunity to every single American – the next President of the United States, Hillary Clinton.

Now, eight years ago, Hillary and I were rivals for the Democratic nomination. We battled for a year and a half. Let me tell you, it was tough, because Hillary's tough. Every time I thought I might have that race won, Hillary just came back stronger.

But after it was all over, I asked Hillary to join my team. She was a little surprised, but ultimately said yes – because she knew that what was at stake was bigger than either of us. And for four years, I had a front-row seat to her intelligence, her judgment, and her discipline. I came to realize that her unbelievable work ethic wasn't for praise or attention – that she was in this for everyone who needs a champion. I understood that after all these years, she has never forgotten just who she's fighting for.

Hillary's still got the tenacity she had as a young woman working at the Children's Defense Fund, going door to door to ultimately make sure kids with disabilities could get a quality education.

She's still got the heart she showed as our First Lady, working with Congress to help push through a Children's Health Insurance Program that to this day protects millions of kids.

She's still seared with the memory of every American she met who lost loved ones on 9/11, which is why, as a Senator from New York, she fought so hard for funding to help first responders; why, as Secretary of State, she sat with me in the Situation Room and forcefully argued in favor of the mission that took out bin Laden.

You know, nothing truly prepares you for the demands of the Oval Office. Until you've sat at that desk, you don't know what it's like to manage a global crisis, or send young people to war. But Hillary's been in the room; she's been part of those decisions. She knows what's at stake in the decisions our government makes for the working family, the senior citizen, the small business owner, the soldier, and the veteran. Even in the middle of crisis, she listens to people, and keeps her cool, and treats everybody with respect. And no matter how daunting the odds; no matter how much people try to knock her down, she never, ever quits.

That's the Hillary I know. That's the Hillary I've come to admire. And that's why I can say with confidence there has never been a man or a woman more qualified than Hillary Clinton to serve as President of the United States of America.

And, by the way, in case you were wondering about her judgment, look at her choice of running mate. Tim Kaine is as good a man, as humble and committed a public servant, as anyone I know. He will be a great Vice President, and he'll make Hillary a better President. Just like my dear friend and brother Joe Biden has made me a better President.

Now, Hillary has real plans to address the concerns she's heard from you on the campaign trail. She's got specific ideas to invest in new jobs, to help workers share in their company's profits, to help put kids in preschool, and put students through college without taking on a ton of debt. That's what leaders do.

And then there's Donald Trump. He's not really a plans guy. Not really a facts guy, either. He calls himself a business guy, which is true, but I have to say, I know plenty of businessmen and women who've achieved success without leaving a trail of lawsuits, and unpaid workers, and people feeling like they got cheated.

Does anyone really believe that a guy who's spent his 70 years on this Earth showing no regard for working people is suddenly going to be your champion? Your voice? If so, you should vote for him. But if you're someone who's truly concerned about paying your bills, and seeing the economy grow, and creating more opportunity for everybody, then the choice isn't even close. If you want someone with a lifelong track record of fighting for higher wages, better benefits, a fairer tax code, a bigger voice for workers, and stronger regulations on Wall Street, then you should vote for Hillary Clinton.

And if you're concerned about who's going to keep you and your family safe in a dangerous world – well, the choice is even clearer. Hillary Clinton is respected around the world not just by leaders, but by the people they serve. She's worked closely with our intelligence teams, our diplomats, our military. And she has the judgment, the experience, and the temperament to meet the threat from terrorism. It's not new to her. Our troops have pounded ISIL without mercy, taking out leaders, taking back territory. I know Hillary won't relent until ISIL is destroyed. She'll finish the job – and she'll do it without resorting to torture, or banning entire religions from entering our country. She is fit to be the next Commander-in-Chief.

Meanwhile, Donald Trump calls our military a disaster. Apparently, he doesn't know the men and women who make up the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. He suggests America is weak. He must not hear the billions of men, women, and children, from the Baltics to Burma, who still look to America to be the light of freedom, dignity, and human rights. He cozies up to Putin, praises Saddam Hussein, and tells the NATO allies that stood by our side after 9/11 that they have to pay up if they want our protection. Well, America's promises do not come with a price tag. We meet our commitments. And that's one reason why almost every country on Earth sees America as stronger and more respected today than they did eight years ago.

America is already great. America is already strong. And I promise you, our strength, our greatness, does not depend on Donald Trump.

In fact, it doesn't depend on any one person. And that, in the end, may be the biggest difference in this election – the meaning of our democracy.

Ronald Reagan called America "a shining city on a hill." Donald Trump calls it "a divided crime scene" that only he can fix. It doesn't matter to him that illegal immigration and the crime rate are as low as they've been in decades, because he's not offering any real solutions to those issues. He's just offering slogans, and he's offering fear. He's betting that if he scares enough people, he might score just enough votes to win this election.

That is another bet that Donald Trump will lose. Because he's selling the American people short. We are not a fragile or frightful people. Our power doesn't come from some self-declared savior promising that he alone can restore order. We don't look to be ruled. Our power comes from those immortal declarations first put to paper right here in Philadelphia all those years ago; We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that together, We, the People, can form a more perfect union.

That's who we are. That's our birthright – the capacity to shape our own destiny. That's what drove patriots to choose revolution over tyranny and our GIs to liberate a continent. It's what gave women the courage to reach for the ballot, and marchers to cross a bridge in Selma, and workers to organize and fight for better wages.

America has never been about what one person says he'll do for us. It's always been about what can be achieved by us, together, through the hard, slow, sometimes frustrating, but ultimately enduring work of self-government.

And that's what Hillary Clinton understands. She knows that this is a big, diverse country, and that most issues are rarely black and white. That even when you're 100 percent right, getting things done requires compromise. That democracy doesn't work if we constantly demonize each other. She knows that for progress to happen, we have to listen to each other, see ourselves in each other, fight for our principles but also fight to find common ground, no matter how elusive that may seem.

Hillary knows we can work through racial divides in this country when we realize the worry black parents feel when their son leaves the house isn't so different than what a brave cop's family feels when he puts on the blue and goes to work; that we can honor police and treat every community fairly. She knows that acknowledging problems that have festered for decades isn't making race relations worse – it's creating the possibility for people of good will to join and make things better.

Hillary knows we can insist on a lawful and orderly immigration system while still seeing striving students and their toiling parents as loving families, not criminals or rapists; families that came here for the same reasons our forebears came – to work, and study, and make a better life, in a place where we can talk and worship and love as we please. She knows their dream is quintessentially American, and the American Dream is something no wall will ever contain.

It can be frustrating, this business of democracy. Trust me, I know. Hillary knows, too. When the other side refuses to compromise, progress can stall. Supporters can grow impatient, and worry that you're not trying hard enough; that you've maybe sold out.

But I promise you, when we keep at it; when we change enough minds; when we deliver enough votes, then progress does happen. Just ask the twenty million more people who have health care today. Just ask the Marine who proudly serves his country without hiding the husband he loves. Democracy works, but we gotta want it – not just during an election year, but all the days in between.

So if you agree that there's too much inequality in our economy, and too much money in our politics, we all need to be as vocal and as organized and as persistent as Bernie Sanders' supporters have been. We all need to get out and vote for Democrats up and down the ticket, and then hold them accountable until they get the job done.

If you want more justice in the justice system, then we've all got to vote – not just for a President, but for mayors, and sheriffs, and state's attorneys, and state legislators. And we've got to work with police and protesters until laws and practices are changed.

If you want to fight climate change, we've got to engage not only young people on college campuses, but reach out to the coal miner who's worried about taking care of his family, the single mom worried about gas prices.

If you want to protect our kids and our cops from gun violence, we've got to get the vast majority of Americans, including gun owners, who agree on background checks to be just as vocal and determined as the gun lobby that blocks change through every funeral we hold. That's how change will happen.

Look, Hillary's got her share of critics. She's been caricatured by the right and by some folks on the left; accused of everything you can imagine – and some things you can't. But she knows that's what happens when you're under a microscope for 40 years. She knows she's made mistakes, just like I have; just like we all do. That's what happens when we try. That's what happens when you're the kind of citizen Teddy Roosevelt once described – not the timid souls who criticize from the sidelines, but someone "who is actually in the arena…who strives valiantly; who errs…[but] who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement."

Hillary Clinton is that woman in the arena. She's been there for us – even if we haven't always noticed. And if you're serious about our democracy, you can't afford to stay home just because she might not align with you on every issue. You've got to get in the arena with her, because democracy isn't a spectator sport. America isn't about "yes he will." It's about "yes we can." And we're going to carry Hillary to victory this fall, because that's what the moment demands.

You know, there's been a lot of talk in this campaign about what America's lost – people who tell us that our way of life is being undermined by pernicious changes and dark forces beyond our control. They tell voters there's a "real America" out there that must be restored. This isn't an idea that started with Donald Trump. It's been peddled by politicians for a long time – probably from the start of our Republic.

And it's got me thinking about the story I told you twelve years ago tonight, about my Kansas grandparents and the things they taught me when I was growing up. They came from the heartland; their ancestors began settling there about 200 years ago. They were Scotch-Irish mostly, farmers, teachers, ranch hands, pharmacists, oil rig workers. Hardy, small town folks. Some were Democrats, but a lot of them were Republicans. My grandparents explained that they didn't like show-offs. They didn't admire braggarts or bullies. They didn't respect mean-spiritedness, or folks who were always looking for shortcuts in life. Instead, they valued traits like honesty and hard work. Kindness and courtesy. Humility; responsibility; helping each other out.

That's what they believed in. True things. Things that last. The things we try to teach our kids.

And what my grandparents understood was that these values weren't limited to Kansas. They weren't limited to small towns. These values could travel to Hawaii; even the other side of the world, where my mother would end up working to help poor women get a better life. They knew these values weren't reserved for one race; they could be passed down to a half-Kenyan grandson, or a half-Asian granddaughter; in fact, they were the same values Michelle's parents, the descendants of slaves, taught their own kids living in a bungalow on the South Side of Chicago. They knew these values were exactly what drew immigrants here, and they believed that the children of those immigrants were just as American as their own, whether they wore a cowboy hat or a yarmulke; a baseball cap or a hijab.

America has changed over the years. But these values my grandparents taught me – they haven't gone anywhere. They're as strong as ever; still cherished by people of every party, every race, and every faith. They live on in each of us. What makes us American, what makes us patriots, is what's in here. That's what matters. That's why we can take the food and music and holidays and styles of other countries, and blend it into something uniquely our own. That's why we can attract strivers and entrepreneurs from around the globe to build new factories and create new industries here. That's why our military can look the way it does, every shade of humanity, forged into common service. That's why anyone who threatens our values, whether fascists or communists or jihadists or homegrown demagogues, will always fail in the end.

That's America. Those bonds of affection; that common creed. We don't fear the future; we shape it, embrace it, as one people, stronger together than we are on our own. That's what Hillary Clinton understands – this fighter, this stateswoman, this mother and grandmother, this public servant, this patriot – that's the America she's fighting for.

And that's why I have confidence, as I leave this stage tonight, that the Democratic Party is in good hands. My time in this office hasn't fixed everything; as much as we've done, there's still so much I want to do. But for all the tough lessons I've had to learn; for all the places I've fallen short; I've told Hillary, and I'll tell you what's picked me back up, every single time.

It's been you. The American people.

It's the letter I keep on my wall from a survivor in Ohio who twice almost lost everything to cancer, but urged me to keep fighting for health care reform, even when the battle seemed lost. Do not quit.

It's the painting I keep in my private office, a big-eyed, green owl, made by a seven year-old girl who was taken from us in Newtown, given to me by her parents so I wouldn't forget – a reminder of all the parents who have turned their grief into action.

It's the small business owner in Colorado who cut most of his own salary so he wouldn't have to lay off any of his workers in the recession – because, he said, "that wouldn't have been in the spirit of America."

It's the conservative in Texas who said he disagreed with me on everything, but appreciated that, like him, I try to be a good dad.

It's the courage of the young soldier from Arizona who nearly died on the battlefield in Afghanistan, but who's learned to speak and walk again – and earlier this year, stepped through the door of the Oval Office on his own power, to salute and shake my hand.

It's every American who believed we could change this country for the better, so many of you who'd never been involved in politics, who picked up phones, and hit the streets, and used the internet in amazing new ways to make change happen. You are the best organizers on the planet, and I'm so proud of all the change you've made possible.

Time and again, you've picked me up. I hope, sometimes, I picked you up, too. Tonight, I ask you to do for Hillary Clinton what you did for me. I ask you to carry her the same way you carried me. Because you're who I was talking about twelve years ago, when I talked about hope – it's been you who've fueled my dogged faith in our future, even when the odds are great; even when the road is long. Hope in the face of difficulty; hope in the face of uncertainty; the audacity of hope!

America, you have vindicated that hope these past eight years. And now I'm ready to pass the baton and do my part as a private citizen. This year, in this election, I'm asking you to join me – to reject cynicism, reject fear, to summon what's best in us; to elect Hillary Clinton as the next President of the United States, and show the world we still believe in the promise of this great nation.

Thank you for this incredible journey. Let's keep it going. God bless the United States of America.



2016 Democratic Convention Speeches & Schedule

Speeches Monday, July 25th, 2016

Stacey Abrams,  State Representative from Georgia
Cory Booker,  Senator from New Jersey
Paul Booth,  DNC platform committee member
Brendan Boyle,  Congressman from Pennsylvania
Bob Brady,  Congressman from Pennsylvania
Bob Casey,  Senator from Pennsylvania
Jason & Jarron Collins,  Former NBA stars
Elijah Cummings,  Congressman from Maryland
Leah Daughtry,  CEO of the 2016 Democratic National Convention Committee
Kevin de León,  State Senator from California
Keith Ellison,  Congressman from Minnesota
Leaders of Major Labor Groups,  Lee Saunders (AFSCME President), Lily Eskelsen Garcia (National Education Association President), Mary Kay Henry (SEIU President), Richard Trumka (AFL-CIO President), Sean McGarvey (Building Trades President) and Randi Weingarten (American
Adriano Espaillat,  State Senator from New York
Luke Feeney,  Mayor of Chillicothe, OH
Barney Frank,  Former member of the U.S. House of Representatives, Massachusetts
Al Franken,  Senator from Minnesota
Shirley Franklin,  Former Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia and DNC platform committee member
Marcia Fudge,  Representative from Ohio and Permanent Chair of the 2016 Democratic National Convention
Kirsten Gillibrand,  Senator from New York
Raul Grijalva,  Congressman from Arizona
Luis Gutierrez,  Congressman from Illinois
Steny Hoyer,  Representative from Maryland
Benjamin Jealous,  President and CEO of the NAACP
Joe Kennedy,  Congressman from Massachusetts
Jim Kenney,  Mayor of Philadelphia
Tina Kotek,  House Speaker from Oregon
Cheryl Lankford,  Spent $35,000 on Trump University
Jesse Lipson,  Founder of ShareFile
Pam Livengood,  personally affected by the growing substance abuse epidemic
Eva Longoria,  Actress and activist
Demi Lovato,  American singer, songwriter, and actress
Nita Lowey,  Congresswoman from New York
Dan Malloy,  Governor from Connecticut
Jeff Merkley,  U.S. Senator from Oregon
Michelle Obama,  First Lady of the United States
Karla & Francisca Ortiz,  daughter of undocumented immigrant parents
John Podesta,  Chairman of the 2016 Hillary Clinton presidential campaign
Diane Russell,  State Representative from Maine
Linda Sánchez,  U.S. Representative from California
Bernie Sanders,  U.S. Senator from Vermont and Former Mayor of Burlington
Jeanne Shaheen,  Senator from New Hampshire
Astrid Silva,  DREAMer activist
Sarah Silverman,  Stand-up comedian and Emmy Awards-winning actress
Anastasia Somoza,  advocate for Americans with intellectual and developmental disabilities
Patricia Spearman,  Nevada State Senator and cleric
Marty Walsh,  Mayor of Boston
Elizabeth Warren,  Senator from Massachusetts
Debbie Wasserman Schultz,  Chair of the DNC and Congresswoman from Florida
Wellington Webb,  First African American Mayor of Denver, Colorado
 

Speeches Tuesday, July 26th, 2016

Madeleine Albright,  Former U.S. Secretary of State
Erika Alexander,  Actress
Na'ilah Amaru,  Hillary for America contest winner
Elizabeth Banks,  Actress, producer, and director
Steve Benjamin,  Mayor of Columbia, SC
Barbara Boxer,  Senator from California
Donna Brazile,  DNC Vice Chair of Voter Registration and Participation
Kate Burdick,  staff attorney at the Juvenile Law Center in Philadelphia
Gwen Carr,  Mother of Eric Garner
Jason Carter,  Former State Senator from Georgia
Jimmy Carter,  39th President of the United States
Katherine Clark,  U.S. Representative from Massachusetts
Bill Clinton,  Former President of the United States
Hillary Clinton,  Live from New York
Joseph Crowley,  Congressman from New York
Howard Dean,  Former Governor of Vermont
Val Demings,  Former Chief of the Orlando Police Department
Thaddeus Desmond,  child advocate social worker from Philadelphia
Lena Dunham & America Ferrera,  Actresses
Eagle Academy Students,  Eagle Academy is a school to educate at-risk youth in New York City
Lois Frankel,  U.S Representative from Florida
Jelani Freeman,  Attorney bringing opportunity to kids at risk
Sybrina Fulton,  Mother of Trayvon Martin
Tulsi Gabbard,  U.S. Representative from Hawaii
Tony Goldwyn,  Actor, producer, director and political activist
Alison Lundergan Grimes,   Secretary of State of Kentucky
Maria Hamilton,  Mother of Dontré Hamilton
Tom Harkin,  Former U.S. Senator from Iowa
Dynah Haubert,  works for a disability rights organization and teaches those with disabilities to advocate for themselves
Eric Holder,  82nd United States Attorney General
Amy Klobuchar,  U.S. Senator from Minnesota
John Lewis,  U.S. Representative from Georgia
Lauren Manning,  one of the most catastrophically wounded survivors of 9/11
Ima Matul Maisaroh,  Sex Trafficking Survivor & Advocate
Terry McAuliffe,  Governor from Virginia
Lucia McBath,  Mother of Jordan Davis
Cameron McLay,  Pittsburgh Police Chief
Lezley McSpadden,  Mother of Michael Brown
Debra Messing,  Actress
Barbara Mikulski,  U.S. Senator from Maryland
Anton Moore,  founded and runs a nonprofit community group that strives to bring awareness and educate youth on gun violence
Ryan Moore,  an advocate for health care reform suffering from spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia dwarfism
Dustin Parsons,  fifth grade teacher at an elementary school in Arkansas
Nancy Pelosi,  House Democratic Leader from California
Cleopatra Pendleton-Cowley,  Mother of Hadiya Pendleton
Geneva Reed-Veal,  Mother of Sandra Bland
Cecile Richards,  Planned Parenthood Action Fund President
Jan Schakowsky,  U.S. Representative from Illinois
Chuck Schumer,  Senator from New York
Meryl Streep,  Three times Academy Awards-winning actress
Joe Sweeney,  detective with the NYPD
Nydia Velázquez,  U.S Representative from New York
Bonnie Watson Coleman,  U.S. Representative from New Jersey
 

Speeches Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

Karen Bass,  U.S. Representative from California
Angela Bassett,  Director and Academy Award-nominated actress
Sharon Belkofer,  Mother of Lt. Col. Thomas Belkofer, who was killed on duty in Afghanistan
Brooks Bell,  Tech entrepreneur from North Carolina
Ami Bera,  U.S. Representative from California
Joe Biden,  Vice President of the United States
Jill Biden,  Second Lady of the United States
Michael Bloomberg,  Businessman, philanthropist and former Mayor of New York City
Jerry Brown,  Governor from California
GK Butterfield,  Congressman from North Carolina
André Carson,  U.S. Representative from Indiana
Judy Chu,  Congresswoman from California
Yvette Clarke,  US Representative from New York
Lee Daniels,  Producer and Academy Awards-nominated director
Bill de Blasio,  New York City Mayor
Jamie Dorff,  wife of Patrick Dorff, an Army helicopter pilot killed in northern Iraq
Daniel Driffin,  HIV/AIDS Activist from Georgia
Mike Duggan,  Mayor of Detroit, Michigan
Ruben Gallego,  Congressman from Arizona
Gabby Giffords & Mark Kelly,  U.S. Representatives from Arizona & Retired American astronaut
Andrew Gillum,   Mayor of Tallahassee, FL
Mazie Hirono,  Senator from Hawaii
Ilyse Hogue,  NARAL President
Eleanor Holmes Norton,  Congresswoman from Washington, DC
John Hutson,  Rear Admiral (Ret. USN)
Jesse Jackson,  civil rights activist, Baptist minister, and politician
Sheila Jackson Lee,  U.S. Representative from Texas
Hakeem Jeffries,  U.S. Representative from New York
Star Jones,  TV personality and attorney
Tim Kaine,  2016 Democratic Vice Presidential Nominee
Kristen Kavanaugh,  Former Marine Corps Captain and co-founder of the Military Acceptance Project
Christine Leinonen,  Mother of Christopher Leinonen, who was killed in the Pulse attack in Orlando
Ben Ray Luján,  Congressman from New Mexico
Michelle Lujan Grisham,  U.S. Representative from New Mexico
Gregory Meeks,  U.S. Representative from New York
Chris Murphy,  Senator from Connecticut
Gavin Newsom,  Lieutenant Governor of California
Barack Obama,  President of the United States
Martin O’Malley,  Former Governor from Maryland
Leon Panetta,  Former Congressman and Secretary of Defense
Charles Ramsey,  Former Philadelphia Police Commissioner
Kasim Reed,  Mayor of Atlanta
Harry Reid,  U.S Senator from Nevada and Senate Minority Leader
Felicia Sanders & Polly Sheppard,  survivors of the Mother Emanuel Church shooting in Charleston, SC
Adam Schiff,  Congressman from California
Stephanie Schriock,  EMILY’s List President
Bobby Scott,  U.S. Representative for Virginia
Erica Smegielski,  outspoken advocate for commonsense gun violence prevention measures
Mark Takano,  US Representative for California
Neera Tanden,  Center for American Progress Action Fund President
Maxine Waters,  Congresswoman from California
Karen Weaver,  Mayor of Flint, Michigan
Sigourney Weaver,  Actress; star of iconic flms like Alien, Ghostbusters and Avatar
Brandon Wolf and Jose Arraigada,  Survivors of the attack at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando
 

Speeches Thursday, July 28th, 2016

Kareem Abdul-Jabaar,  NBA Hall of Famer
Raumesh Akbari,  State Representative from Tennessee
John Allen,  General and former Commander (ret. USMC)
Tammy Baldwin,  U.S. Senator from Wisconsin
Reverend William Barber,  Minister & Activist
Joyce Beatty,  Congresswoman from Ohio
Xavier Becerra,  Congressman from California
Barbara Boxer,  U.S. Senator from California
Sherrod Brown,  Senator from Ohio
Maria Cantwell,  U.S. Senator from Washington
Joaquin Castro,  Congressman from Texas
Emanuel Cleaver,  U.S. Representative from Missouri
Chelsea Clinton,  daughter of Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton,  2016 Democratic Presidential Nominee
James Clyburn,  Congressman from South Carolina
Andrew Cuomo,  Governor of New York
Ted Danson & Mary Steenburgen,  Actor and Actress
Mark Dayton,  Governor from Minnesota
Ted Deutch,  U.S. Representative from Florida
DNC Video,  Hillary Clinton
Tammy Duckworth,  U.S. Representative from Illinois
Crisanta Duran,  Majority Leader State Representative from Colorado
Doug Elmets,  Former Reagan Administration official
Cameron Esposito,  comedian presents tax video
Peggy Flanagan,  State Representative from Minnesota
Eric Garcetti,  Mayor of Los Angeles
Kirsten Gillibrand,  U.S. Senator from New York
Chloe Grace Moretz,  Actress
Jennifer Granholm,  Former Governor from Michigan
Chad Griffin,  President of the Human Rights Campaign
Florent Groberg,  Retired U.S. Army Captain and recipient of the Medal of Honor
Jaime Harrison,  Democratic State Party Chair from South Carolina
John Hickenlooper,  Governor from Colorado
Mazie Hirono,  U.S. Senator from Hawaii
Dolores Huerta,  Labor leader and civil rights activist
Henrietta Ivey,  home care worker who is helping to lead the Fight for $15
Gene Karpinski,  League of Conservation Voters President
Khizr Khan,  father of Humayun Khan, a University of Virginia graduate and one of 14 American Muslims who died serving the United States
Ruben Kihuen,  State Senator from Nevada
Amy Klobuchar,  Senator from Minnesota
Ted Lieu,  Congressman from California
Jennifer Pierotti Lim,  Co-Founder of Republican Women for Hillary & Director of Health Policy, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Jennifer Loudon,  Widow of slain Chicago police Officer Thor Soderberg
Sean Patrick Maloney,  Congressman from New York
Sean Patrick Maloney & Sarah McBride,  LGBT rights activists
Marlon Marshall,  Director of States and Political Engagement, Hillary for America
Beth Mathias,  works two jobs and her husband works the nightshift at a factory in Ohio
Claire McCaskill,  U.S. Senator from Missouri
Katie McGinty,  Former state and federal environmental policy official
Barbara Mikulski,  U.S. Senator from Maryland
Gwen Moore,  Congresswoman from Wisconsin
Patty Murray,  U.S. Senator from Washington
Michael Nutter,  Mayor of Philadelphia
Barbara Owens & Wayne Owens,  Family members of a fallen law enforcement officer
Nancy Pelosi,  Minority Leader of the U.S House of Representatives
Katy Perry,  Singer-singwriter
Lorella Praeli,  Latino Outreach Director, Hillary for America
Cedric Richmond,  U.S. Representative from Louisiana
Tim Ryan,  U.S. Representative from Ohio
Bakari Sellers,  Former State Representative from South Carolina
Jeanne Shaheen,  U.S. Senator from New Hampshire
Lupe Valdez,   Sheriff of Dallas County, Texas
Antonio Villaraigosa,  Former Mayor of Los Angeles
Jensen Walcott & Jake Reed,  a pizza restaurant worker fired for asking her boss why she was paid 25 cents less than her male co-worker and friend, Jake
Wayne Walker,  Family member of fallen law enforcement officer
Elizabeth Warren,  U.S. Senator from Massachusetts
Dave Wills,  8th grade social studies teacher from Guilford County, NC
Tom Wolf,  Governor of Pennsylvania
 

Democratic Convention Speeches with dates yet to be determined

Andra Day,  Singing "Rise Up"
Andra Day,  Singing "Rise Up"
Suzan DelBene,  U.S. Representative from Washington
 



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Brokered and Contested Democratic Conventions


Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia, PA
July 25-28 2016
Democratic National Convention Homepage
Convention Schedule Party Platform
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 2016 Democratic Convention
 
 
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Monday, July 25, 2016  |  United Together

 
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Tuesday, July 26, 2016  |  A Lifetime Of Fighting ...

 
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Wednesday, July 27, 2016 |  Working Together

 
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Thursday, July 28, 2016  |  Stronger Together

 
 Democratic Convention Speeches
   
Kareem Abdul-Jabaar
Stacey Abrams
Raumesh Akbari
Madeleine Albright
Erika Alexander
John Allen
Na'ilah Amaru
Tammy Baldwin
Elizabeth Banks
Reverend William Barber
Karen Bass
Angela Bassett
Joyce Beatty
Xavier Becerra
Sharon Belkofer
Brooks Bell
Steve Benjamin
Ami Bera
Joe Biden
Jill Biden
Michael Bloomberg
Cory Booker
Paul Booth
Barbara Boxer
Barbara Boxer
Brendan Boyle
Bob Brady
Donna Brazile
Jerry Brown
Sherrod Brown
Kate Burdick
GK Butterfield
Maria Cantwell
Gwen Carr
André Carson
Jason Carter
Jimmy Carter
Bob Casey
Joaquin Castro
Judy Chu
Katherine Clark
Yvette Clarke
Emanuel Cleaver
Bill Clinton
Chelsea Clinton
Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton
James Clyburn
Jason & Jarron Collins
Joseph Crowley
Elijah Cummings
Andrew Cuomo
Lee Daniels
Ted Danson & Mary Steenburgen
Leah Daughtry
Mark Dayton
Bill de Blasio
Kevin de León
Howard Dean
Val Demings
Thaddeus Desmond
Ted Deutch
DNC Video
Jamie Dorff
Daniel Driffin
Tammy Duckworth
Mike Duggan
Lena Dunham & America Ferrera
Crisanta Duran
Eagle Academy Students
Keith Ellison
Doug Elmets
Leaders of Major Labor Groups
Adriano Espaillat
Cameron Esposito
Luke Feeney
Peggy Flanagan
Barney Frank
Lois Frankel
Al Franken
Shirley Franklin
Jelani Freeman
Marcia Fudge
Sybrina Fulton
Tulsi Gabbard
Ruben Gallego
Eric Garcetti
Gabby Giffords & Mark Kelly
Kirsten Gillibrand
Kirsten Gillibrand
Andrew Gillum
Tony Goldwyn
Chloe Grace Moretz
Jennifer Granholm
Chad Griffin
Raul Grijalva
Alison Lundergan Grimes
Florent Groberg
Luis Gutierrez
Maria Hamilton
Tom Harkin
Jaime Harrison
Dynah Haubert
John Hickenlooper
Mazie Hirono
Mazie Hirono
Ilyse Hogue
Eric Holder
Eleanor Holmes Norton
Steny Hoyer
Dolores Huerta
John Hutson
Henrietta Ivey
Jesse Jackson
Sheila Jackson Lee
Benjamin Jealous
Hakeem Jeffries
Star Jones
Tim Kaine
Gene Karpinski
Kristen Kavanaugh
Joe Kennedy
Jim Kenney
Khizr Khan
Ruben Kihuen
Amy Klobuchar
Amy Klobuchar
Tina Kotek
Cheryl Lankford
Christine Leinonen
John Lewis
Ted Lieu
Jennifer Pierotti Lim
Jesse Lipson
Pam Livengood
Eva Longoria
Jennifer Loudon
Demi Lovato
Nita Lowey
Ben Ray Luján
Michelle Lujan Grisham
Dan Malloy
Sean Patrick Maloney
Sean Patrick Maloney & Sarah McBride
Lauren Manning
Marlon Marshall
Beth Mathias
Ima Matul Maisaroh
Terry McAuliffe
Lucia McBath
Claire McCaskill
Katie McGinty
Cameron McLay
Lezley McSpadden
Gregory Meeks
Jeff Merkley
Debra Messing
Barbara Mikulski
Barbara Mikulski
Anton Moore
Ryan Moore
Gwen Moore
Chris Murphy
Patty Murray
Gavin Newsom
Michael Nutter
Michelle Obama
Barack Obama
Martin O’Malley
Karla & Francisca Ortiz
Barbara Owens & Wayne Owens
Leon Panetta
Dustin Parsons
Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
Cleopatra Pendleton-Cowley
Katy Perry
John Podesta
Lorella Praeli
Charles Ramsey
Kasim Reed
Geneva Reed-Veal
Harry Reid
Cecile Richards
Cedric Richmond
Diane Russell
Tim Ryan
Linda Sánchez
Bernie Sanders
Felicia Sanders & Polly Sheppard
Jan Schakowsky
Adam Schiff
Stephanie Schriock
Chuck Schumer
Bobby Scott
Bakari Sellers
Jeanne Shaheen
Jeanne Shaheen
Astrid Silva
Sarah Silverman
Erica Smegielski
Anastasia Somoza
Patricia Spearman
Meryl Streep
Joe Sweeney
Mark Takano
Neera Tanden
Lupe Valdez
Nydia Velázquez
Antonio Villaraigosa
Jensen Walcott & Jake Reed
Wayne Walker
Marty Walsh
Elizabeth Warren
Elizabeth Warren
Debbie Wasserman Schultz
Maxine Waters
Bonnie Watson Coleman
Karen Weaver
Sigourney Weaver
Wellington Webb
Dave Wills
Tom Wolf
Brandon Wolf and Jose Arraigada
224 DNC Speeches and Transcripts
 
 
 Trump vs. Clinton Debates
 
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September 26th, 2016   |   Hempstead, NY

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October 4th, 2016   |   Farmville, VA

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October 9th, 2016   |   St. Louis, MO

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October 19th, 2016   |   Las Vegas, NV

 
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